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Unread 12-30-2001, 09:56 PM   #26
Jude
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Jac and Chachchach: I don't really understand your questions about needing a degree for shlichus or if not needing it, then how it would be beneficial, when the Rebbe is quoted in this very thread as being not only OPPOSED to it, but VERY ADAMANTLY AGAINST IT. Take it up with the Rebbe ...

About not wanting to be limited to teaching and how shlichus can be done through other careers, again, as was said in earlier posts, THE REBBE SOMETIMES told people: baalei teshuva and/or those who asked, to go to college. These are EXCEPTIONS to the Rebbe's CLEAR POSITION on college.

A person has to be very honest with him/herself and consult with somebody objective (mashpia) so that they don't fool themselves into thinking some career is actually a shlichus. Do you mean a CAREER, and the person will do some hafatza on the side? Or do you mean some other form of SHLICHUS which is not directly classroom teaching?
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Unread 01-10-2002, 10:43 AM   #27
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I just read an amazing story which is extremely appropriate to this thread. It is the book called "Farbrengen" by "Rabbi Chaim Dalfin":

"A teacher in one of the Chabad schools in Israel was interested in attending college. She wrote to the Rebbe who directed her to Rabbi Garelick, the rav of Kfar Chabad, for advice. As she entered Rabbi Garelick's home she found a women holding a chicken, asking the rav a question about its kosher status.

The Rov asked her to bring a knife. He then cut the gizzard and found a nail inside, which rendered the chicken treif.

Staring at the chicken, Rabbi Garelick said. "Your owner provided you with all your needs; he gave you food and other good things. Yet you were not satisfied. you went into foreign pastures, stealing from other people's property and ended up swallowing a nail, causing you to be treif. You are treif, treif, treif."

The teacher, hearing this, understood her answer. She turned around, without ever asking Rabbi Garelick her question, and went home"
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Unread 02-23-2002, 04:51 PM   #28
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i would like to understand the reasoning for anyone taking a college degree in order to succeed on shlichus.

tzemach (thanks!) has posted clear answers from the Rebbe about the dangers of college and why the Rebbe thinks it is unneccesary. There were a few cases where the Rebbe let someone go to college, but they were definately the exception not the rule.

For someone who is going on the REBBE'S shlichus to turn around and say 'i know better, i think a college degree is important' is ridiculous. As anyone on shlichus will testify, when you are on shlichus things run lemayla miderech hateva - everything is the Rebbe's kochos - do you really think that the Rebbe needs you to have a college degree in order that your shlichus will work? a few more maamorim baal peh will be a much better kli for the Rebbe's brochos!
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Unread 02-24-2002, 03:36 AM   #29
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As a Shliach, I have to agree with the Meshalaiach - The Rebbe, who in general was very against people going to College/University. Especially now, when you can practically get any degree online! There is no need to go to the college environment if you can do the same thing at home, on your computer.

<<But why did the Rebbe go to college?>>

I heard the Rebbe said, "that's why I'm telling you not to go"
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Unread 03-16-2002, 08:25 AM   #30
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BS”D

Not to Weaken the Desire of Youth to Learn Torah

Many parents, with the best of intentions, encourage their children to become involved in earning a living when they are not yet ready.

The following is an answer given to parents who wanted to send their son to learn a trade in college, who asked for the Rebbe’s blessing:

In this time of confusion, especially amongst the youth – when Hashem has blessed them (i.e. the parents) and their children with a firm desire to learn Torah, and they have no doubt in this - one must take great care not to weaken them in this at all (because the weakness is liable to arouse a thought of doubt etc.), and on the contrary, one must encourage them in this. This is important not only for their success in their studies, but also for the completion of their world outlook, not to be seduced at all by the environment on the outside (including – that of college). Therefore it is proper that they influence also their son Shlomo to enter full-day studies in Yeshiva, at least for a year – two years. And concerning the livelihood of their sons – they should wait until their sons will start to talk about it. May Hashem bring them success.

Bais Moshiach Issue 267, translation from Hebrew.

The Rebbe seems to be saying that as long as the child wants to continue studying, the parents should not encourage the child to stop and start thinking about parnoso: "And concerning the livelihood of their sons – they should wait until their sons will start to talk about it." Even after marriage, there is a year of Kollel to solidify one's relationship with Torah. It is only if the son himself initiates the suggestion, which is an indication of a loss of interest in his studies, that it should be addressed.

Indeed, Mashpi'im are known to discourage the unmarried from worrying about "Tachlis" until after they marry and have attended Kollel for a year.

But many parents with daughters of a marriageable age insist that the prospective shidduch already have a stable parnoso (living). How is this possible if, according to the system, continued studying is encouraged? This leaves the otherwise prospective shidduch stuck in a no-win situation!
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Unread 03-18-2002, 10:54 AM   #31
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Frum men are going off to prison in droves, because they are forced to resort to shady dealings to earn a living to support their families. Why? (1) Because they don't have the college education necessary to get a normal decent job, and (2) because the attitude in frum circles about secular law is very relaxed.
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Unread 03-18-2002, 11:12 AM   #32
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About the comments people have made about the ease of getting a degree online, on your computer, about girls-only or boys-only programs, etc. - who says that the Rebbe approves of these? Is it a fact that the only reason the Rebbe denounced going to college was because of co-ed or because of the atmosphere or because of being required to take possibly objectionable courses?

I am asking - please respond in kind
with sources

about frum people being "forced" to be dishonest -
I say they are not "forced" but enticed to do so, by - like you say, a relaxed attitude to honesty, and the lure of $$$
I am sure that the ones in jail are not there because their families were starving, but because they were after "big bucks."
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Unread 03-19-2002, 01:59 AM   #33
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<< So you may ask, why, if the Rebbe held college was wrong for so many reasons, did he grant permission to some to go? It must have to do with those few people's individual shlichus and life circumstances... >>

Virtually all of the cases known to me of where the Rebbe agreed to someone going to college were of Ba’alei Teshuva who had already started their courses. How can anyone honestly conclude from this that the Rebbe holds that someone from a frum (never mind Chassidishe) background could/should attend college? Especially if this pressure is coming from the mother, as Tzemach quotes, it is suspect. Despite all the parents' best intentions, the true reality is that it is dangerous and detrimental for their child. Parents should put their children’s spiritual welfare first.

<< You know, there's a difference between consulting the Rebbe or a mashpia and INFORMING them, this is what I'm doing, give me your blessings... The klal has always been, the Rebbe answers in kind, i.e. it often depends on how a question is asked, or even on whether it's asked, etc.>>

If someone strongly expresses a wish to go to college, the Rebbe might not tell him not to because:

1) He knows that they will not listen - “mutav sheyi’hiyu shoigegin” (it is better that they sin unintentionally).

2) Even if he estimates that they will listen, he follows the way of Hashem: “Be’derech sheho’odom roitse lailaich, moilichin oisoi” – a person is led down the path he wants to follow, whether for the positive or otherwise. Perhaps we could also say that for this reason the Rebbe finds some good in what the person wants, and therefore “agrees”, even though that is not what is really, ideally good for him.

When will the person really receive the answer according to what is best for HIM/HER personally? Only if he approaches the Rebbe without any foregone conclusions.

And the same hold true for asking this to one's Mashpia...

<< About people like the Rebbe, the Alter Rebbe writes in Tanya (end of ch. "This is the reason why the Rambam and the Ramban have engaged in such studies" [=in order to use it out in Avodas Hashem]>>

I.e. Only people on a lofty level are able to elevate secular wisdoms. Just clarifying.
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Unread 03-19-2002, 09:08 AM   #34
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As far as your suggested reasons 1 and 2 - I don't see how this fits with what you maintain in other posts, that being exposed to co-ed (and in most, if not all cases where the Rebbe gave permission to go to college, the situation was co-ed) and heretical ideas (common in college no matter your major) that this puts a person in a situation where he is more than likely to transgress isurim d'oraisa.
We don't say "better he should sin unintentionally" with issurei d'oraisa! And surely, the likelihood of sinning in isurei d'oraisa is not even remotely close to ideal!

Can we possibly conclude from this, that exposure to situations where lack of tznius, or simply co-ed, prevails, plus definite exposure to heretical ideas, is acceptable when one's motivations (obtaining a degree for ex.) are all right? Similar to the quote somebody posted from R' Moshe about going to work on the subway?

For otherwise, how do you understand this?
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Unread 03-25-2002, 12:30 AM   #35
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Unhappy Why You?

When I first heard of YU. I thought it was a question of why you should go there? I hear what you are saying that the Rebbe said you should learn at least a few years or one in a regular yeshiva or at least get married before. I even heard that one should wait until one is 20.

I am really confused.

I want to know how do I get an answer now?

I have read a few of the Rebbes Letters that were sent lkavod Pesach and they say in a very terse and almost shouting matter that the Hanhala of yeshiva has to direct the students in the proper way. IF the proper way is not to go then why is my mashpia so accepting of the information that I tell him that my parents say it is a must. Why is he giving up? Why am I giving up? And why do I believe I should go????????????????
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Unread 03-25-2002, 02:25 AM   #36
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BS"D Jude is just trying to understand the inyan, the concept. She certainly doesn't want you to interpret her words as some kind of leniency.

D3Voice: I'll bet your parents are BTs. I don't know you, but I would speculate that the reason why you think you should go is because you've been brainwashed by your parents and various insidious goyishe influences. Attitudes are not formed in a vacuum. Please carefully read the goyishe culture and us thread and the newspapers, Radio and TV thread.

<<I want to know how do I get an answer now? >>

The Rebbe warned many times, very clearly, that it is forbidden to go to college, despite all the best intentions of the parents (whom the son/daughter mindlessly, "obediently" follows). Don't rely on balei battim (married people) for your ruchnius or you are in grave danger... Please read over all the sichos and letters posted on this thread.

Another important point: it is not your "mashpia" (how does he get away calling himself that?! ) or your parents who are going, but YOU. And it is YOU who will have to suffer and live for your whole life with the scars of university.

They are putting your neshomo in dire peril for the imaginary promise of parnoso. Can they gaurantee this will bring you parnoso? Of course not. Parnoso comes from Hashem alone. But the Rebbe gaurantees that the effects of attending university are devastating...

Last night I was up late at a 11 Nissan farb. and this topic arose. A bochur was there - a good friend - who goes to university. He said to me - "it's easy for you to talk. You've been spending all your time in Yeshiva. You cannot BEGIN to understand what it's really like in university. All the kids in my class are so grob you wouldn't believe." And I had to admit he was right. So really, he could explain to me much better than I could explain to him the evil of university. BTW he is noticably lacking in basic frumkeit, which wasn't the case before he went...

I say: Let all of these well-meaning parents (especially mothers) and "mashpi'im" who don't protest to this spend just a few days in university themselves and mingle with the same kind of people with whom their children would mingle, come to recognise the terrible nisyoinois (tests) that kids experience and see if they are still in such a rush to sacrifice their children's neshomois...

May Hashem give you the strength to stand up for yourself and protect yourself and your future!

Last edited by noahidelaws; 03-25-2002 at 09:00 AM.
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Unread 03-25-2002, 07:48 AM   #37
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<<<We don't say "better he should sin unintentionally" with issurei d'oraisa! And surely, the likelihood of sinning in isurei d'oraisa is not even remotely close to ideal!>>

Just to clarify (but perhaps here its not so applicble, since its my opinion that there is no issur d'oraisa per se, and Nohah opinion that its an explicit issur), even with isurei d'oraisa we say better one should sin unintentionally, but it depends if the issur is explicit in the Torah versus an issur we derive through the 13 methods of Reb Yishmeol or otherwise.

Last edited by RavLub; 03-25-2002 at 11:09 PM.
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Unread 03-25-2002, 08:58 AM   #38
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BS"D
<<Can we possibly conclude from this, that exposure to...co-ed, prevails is acceptable when one's motivations (obtaining a degree for ex.) are all right?>>

The Rebbe clearly stresses that all the best intentions do not justify the certain danger in which one places one's soul by attending college. How can you possibly think otherwise, after reading all the sichos posted above?

<<Can we possibly conclude from this, that ...definite exposure to heretical ideas, is acceptable when one's motivations (obtaining a degree for ex.) are all right?>>

I have clearly quoted many sources which prove that reading literature which expresses heretical, secular opinions is clearly Scripturally forbidden according to the pesukim of ‘al sifnu el ho’elilim’ and ‘lo sosuru acharei levavchem’, and not just midas Chassidus of Kaddesh atsmecho bemutor loch.

Reb Moishe Feinshtein rules clearly that ‘da mah shetoshiv’ is only applicable to ‘gedoilai hador beTorah veYiras Shomayim’ (great, G-d fearing scholars) and not for ‘stam b’nei odom’ (ordinary people). ”
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Unread 03-26-2002, 12:23 AM   #39
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I think I'll pass on sticking my nose into the Halachic battles of Noahide and Masbir (although it makes for fascinating reading ), but I'd like to share a story I was personally involved with, in response to D3Voice.

About five years ago, I was approached by a young recently married BT, who was being advised by a number of "mashpiim" to finish up his college degree. He came to see me because he was concerned about the fact that when he wrote to the Rebbe and put a letter into the Igros Kodesh, he did not receive a response which even remotely related to his question, and he did not want to take such a step without the Rebbe's brocho.

The "mashpiim" that he was in touch with told him that there was no response because the Rebbe said a person should consult a mashpia, and therefore did not need to respond himself. This did not satisfy him, and he kept writing and inserting letters without getting an answer, until someone suggested that he consult with me.

He told me his whole story, including the fact that his father promised to support him through college, but only if he actually attended, and that he had no other means of support. He also told me who were the "mashpiim" advising him (and his wife), and these were actually very respected people, who were trying to convince him that this was his shlichus.

Before I offered my opinion, I warned him that he was not going to want to hear what I had to say, and if he really wanted to go to college he should consult with someone else. After he insisted, I suggested that he was not getting an answer, because he was asking the wrong thing.

He had been writing to inform the Rebbe that he would be going to college and asking for a brocho. Instead, he should be writing to the Rebbe saying that he is giving himself over completely to the Rebbe's shlichus, and is asking the Rebbe if his shlichus includes attending university. I also told him not to ask, if he was not certain he would follow the answer, and that he should think it over first.

He became very excited, and wanted to write immediately, but I insisted he call his wife first. Since he might receive an answer not to go, and would lose the support of his father, he needed his wife's permission. He called her on the spot, and she agreed right away that the Rebbe's shlichus is more important than any other consideration.

After composing his letter, he placed it at random into a volume of Igros Kodesh, and opened to a letter where the Rebbe writes, "how can you think about continuing your own education, when there are so many youth that are estranged from Yiddishkeit, and we need all the manpower available to reach out to them, to bring Moshiach that much sooner."

The end of the story is that today he is a successful shaliach, who has sent many young people to learn in Hadar HaTorah, Machon Chana and Maayanot. I even was able to guide him in how to deal with his father (who is a sofeik yid), who continues to help him financially till this day.

So, if your mashpia seems to be caving in to pressure from your parents, maybe you need to go "over his head," but you certainly should NOT give up!
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Unread 03-26-2002, 12:50 AM   #40
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well goimg tp collage does sound attractive. won't it be cool to have a phd. to be called a doctor. why then the person won't have to work hard to make a living he will be able to study torah in peace.
for one we must believe that hashem does supply us with parnasah. but i would like to say that it is in my opinion that a person should not take off time to study for a job during his/hers yeshivah years based on the aforementiend piont. but its the time to look for job he may go colloge to learn a trade. just like the old days it took time for someone to become a blacksmith- today one can learn to be docter.
well thats what i think
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Unread 03-26-2002, 01:04 AM   #41
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I'm a soon-to-be-convert myself who has to decide between university (math / CS major, no less) or a job in Crown Heights. It is not an easy decision.
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Unread 03-26-2002, 08:42 AM   #42
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BS"D Jude asks in post # 32: <<I am asking - please respond in kind with sources >>

Here the Rebbe writes to a girl who is asking about attending some kind of secular trade school:

Not to Study in a School Which is Not in a Spirit of Fear of Heaven

It is understood that you are correct in that which you write that there are girls (and boys as well) who are not fit for positions (involvement) in education and instruction, and it is understood that they too should be helped to select an appropriate profession, which includes the most important of all professions – to be a good “akeres habayis” (mainstay of the Jewish home).

It is also obvious that if there is no school that offers [to train one in] a particular profession and is appropriate to these conditions, then this is a test from Hashem (similar to earning a living through transgression of Shabbos). The analogy given for this is famous – that one would not heal a hand or the like if the treatment would lead the sick person, Heaven forbid, to death. This would hold true even if the treatment is tried and tested to cure the hand one hundred percent, and even if the hand would heal immediately and the death would happen after a while.

You surely participate (and will participate with greater involvement) in mivtzoim, and Hashem should bless you with success.

Heichal Menachem Vol. 2 p. 56.

Obvious conclusions:

1) One should learn a profession if necessary, but the top priority "profession" is to be a proper akeres habayis.

2) This can never be done at the expense of exposing oneself to secular influences, for they are sure to cause spiritual death, r"l.
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Unread 04-02-2002, 01:27 AM   #43
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Question Rav Lub

I have already spoken to my parents and they do not agree to letting me stay in yeshiva or even writin g to the Rebbe. They say straight to YU and after that once you have a degree if you wish to get smicha or learn in Yeshiva fine we will support you.

All the Rebbe said, and all that I told her fell on deaf ears. Is there still a way to speak to the Rebbe. He is here I lknow it but will he help me.

I might add that I have an older brother who is learning there now and he still has his beard. Hangs out only with Lubavitch, learns chassidus. And all/
maybe that is the Problem
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Unread 04-08-2002, 12:25 AM   #44
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D3Voice,
You write in another thread that you haven't really gotten into learning, and maybe that is a big part of the problem. The rule that "the way in which a person wants to go, he is led" only applies to someone who really wants to go on a particular path. However, it sounds like you yourself are pretty ambivalent about the whole issue, although you seem to lean away from college.

If you could demonstrate to your parents that you take your learning very seriously, that would probably buy you some time in Yeshiva (another 1/2 a year or year), and would make any future discussions a lot less tense. This would also demonstrate to your Mashpia that keeping you in Yeshiva is something worth fighting for, as well as generating some much needed Siyata D'Shmaya.

However things work out for you, I wish you much success.

As far as Ponder's comments about PHDs, my father has one, and the only thing he ever wanted for his children was that they be or marry, Talmidei Chachamim (he is not YET Lub., but he seems to be coping with the fact that one of his sons is one). He seems to think it's about as cool as an igloo in a volcano.
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Unread 04-09-2002, 02:25 AM   #45
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I was just reading the other day the "English Igrois" (I think it was "the Rebbe writes") Vol. 2 there are a few letters that deal with this issue (College).

I don't have this book in front of me right now; I'd appreciate if someone [with the book] can write up some of the responses for everyone. (?)
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Unread 04-15-2002, 07:01 PM   #46
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(I know that the initial question was about the Rebbe's view on this, but...)

R. Yosef Chaim Sonnenfeld and other Gedolim described a parent who entrusted his child to secular schooling (whether to a non-Jewish school or a Jewish school founded upon non-Torah principles) as one who "delivered his child to the Molech" (R"L). Just as a parent is responsible for the physical care of his offspring, so must he be aware that the development of his child's soul depends largely upon his initiative.

The impressionable mind of a young child is molded not only by the contents of a lesson; he also senses a teacher's attitude by the latter's behavior and even by a mere passing remark. Constant exposure to an atmosphere or to a personality which does not conform with Torah-standards, therefore, may affect the child's spiritual stature for life.

In a case of an adolescent being sent to college, a parent will formulate ever so many justifications and rationalizations. Yet there is no question that the parent is unable to calculate and foresee the damage which will be inflicted upon the child's soul once he is exposed to the immoral environment of the university and the decadent philosophies cleverly espoused by sophisticated professors. As soon as he passed "into the domain of the Molech priests", they are granted power over his mind.

It is a Jew’s task to educate his offspring’s in an environment of Kedusha and develop all their capabilities in the service of Hashem

(The Midrash Says)
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Unread 04-21-2002, 08:55 AM   #47
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Hypocrisy? Necessity?

Considering everything the Rebbe said about secular studies and a college education, why is it that so called experts with degrees (both Lub. and not Lub.) are called upon to lecture or to actually fill positions within Lubavitch communities?

I personally consider it a chilul Lubavitch when some "outsider" with "credentials" is invited to come and lecture about chinuch, as though the Rebbe and Chasidus in general don't quite deal with it

Those organizing these programs do so though, because lots and lots of people are impressed by the titles, degrees, and seeming greater knowledge of the issues within Lubavitch communities than the Chasidim themselves

And then there are the shluchim/shluchos who run pre-school and other educational programs who get degrees because otherwise, suppposedly, why would anybody come to their school? Something's wrong here, methinks ...
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Unread 04-21-2002, 03:19 PM   #48
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If a shliach/shlucha wants to open a school, and parents will NOT send their children to the school unless it's run by people with degrees, then they should get degrees and enable the hundreds of Jewish children to get a Jewish education! Look at the big picture of it!

About organizations inviting lecturers who have degrees, etc.: It's one story if they're invited specifically because of their degrees; another if they happen to have the degree but can also offer a whole lot to the community, and so are invited to speak. You yourself have mentioned the different things Lubavitch can learn from other schools (tznius of Bais Yaacovs, etc.), so what is wrong with having an "outsider" (?!) share some insights with us, as long as it brings about good results? Do you only attend Lubavitcher lectures?
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Unread 04-21-2002, 03:45 PM   #49
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I hear the rational argument behind shluchim getting degrees, but I am still not convinced. What would convince me? If the Rebbe gave answers to shluchim to get degrees for their shlichus!

The Rebbe spoke so strongly against college, and I have yet to read ANYTHING from the Rebbe which made degrees for shlichus purposes the exception to the rule. Have you?

On the contrary, when people asked whether they should learn the foreign language of the country they were going on shlichus to, obviously - to better reach out to Jews, the Rebbe said NO. So where did this "heter" come from?

I don't see the comparison between learning tznius from a particular group when we all have the same halachos, and learning anything related to the avoda of a Chasid from a non-Chasid!

One can definitely learn positive and/or helpful things from non-Lubs. One can learn from everyone and everything.

The problem is when people cannot differentiate between ideas that are in consonance with Chassidus and those that contradict it.

Are Anash so familiar with their own teachings, and are they found inadequate, so that we need to turn to others for help? Shouldn't we be embarrassed by this?

It reminds me of the Rashi in the beginning of parshas Mishpatim which says don't even go to gentile courts when you know they rule the same as Torah does in a particular case, because it's a desecration of Torah.

I have a set of tapes from a lecture given in Cr. Hts. to parents about chinuch, from an expert in the field. He is not a Chabad Chassid. He was asked in advance to quote a sicha from the Rebbe on chinuch, which he did, and then he promptly went on to contradict that very sicha with his lecture!
I wondered: Did anybody notice?

There's something that seems to reflect on our poor Chasidic self-image, when we need somebody to tell us how to be mechanech our children better than the Rebbe can ...

Do I attend only Lubavitch lectures?
The truth?
It's very hard for me to attend anything but, these days. I am so aware of the contradictions, it makes listening difficult. When/if I do listen to tapes/lectures - I am very conscious of anything that differs from Chassidus, and I discuss questions I have with a mashpia.

I have a similar problem with many Jewish books. I can't read them in "peace," because I am constantly finding where they differ from the approach of Chassidus.

I think it is vital that we (Anash) become far more aware of OUR teachings, and if we still feel that we can benefit from someone not Chabad, then the person's lecture has to be previewed by someone knowledgeable to see if it's suitable for Anash.

Last edited by Jude; 04-21-2002 at 04:24 PM.
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Unread 04-21-2002, 04:27 PM   #50
Jac
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Ok, I understand your point. However, I still do not see that a shliach shoudln't open a preschool simply because he doesn't have a degree! If it's for the pure purposes of shluchus, why not? It's real, it's true, it isn't just an excuse!

What do you mean that people shouldn't learn the foreign language? Since when aren't we supposed to aquaint ourselves with the language of the place where we will be doing shluchus? When bochurim go to Russia or when couples visit a foreign country to make a seder, they certainly do listen to tapes in Russian or any other language! Where and when did the Rebbe advise against this? Or are you referring to going to SCHOOL for learning it?

<<I don't see the comparison between learning tznius from a particular group, and learning anything related to the life of a Chasid from a non-Chasid! ...
Are Anash so familiar with their own teachings, and are they found inadequate, so that we need to turn to others for help? Shouldn't we be embarrassed by this? ...
There's something that seems to reflect on our poor Chasidic self-image, when we need somebody to tell us how to be mechanech our children better than the Rebbe can ...
>>

We're discussing if it's okay for a non-lubavitcher mechanech to lecture about chinuch, right? My point was that --even though they are not Chabad--there is still plenty that we can learn from others, especially in the field of chinuch. It's not a matter of insecurities--on the contrary, we are secure enough with out methods that we do not feel threatened to "compare notes" and learn from what they have to say.

Did the Rebbe not advise Bais Rivkah to follow some policies of Bais Yaacov's, to check what their policies are? Does that mean that we we found our own teachings inadequate, heaven forbid? No. It means that we are open to learning from all our brethern, and sometimes they can have wonderful ideas too!

I agree that we have to be very careful with what the speaker will say and to try to ascertain that it will not contradict Chassidus, etc. (I mentioned the non-lubavitcher lectures because I recalled you mentioning having attended a lecture where a giyores of Stolin spoke, etc., so I thought you probably do attend other lectures.) I'm glad you mention other books etc.--I too have a difficult time listening and reading other books, when there are so many differences with Chassidus. (Does that mean that we should only stick to Chabad books and the like? That does narrow it all down quite a bit!)

<<I think it is vital that we (Anash) become far more aware of OUR teachings, and if we still feel that we can benefit from someone not Chabad, then the person's lecture has to be previewed by someone knowledgeable to see if it's suitable for Anash.>>
Agreed. There's much to be gained from others, but it's important that it not contradict our beliefs. (It's just so beneficial to be open to other people too, especially since that makes it possible to learn so much more, for there are obviously way more mechanchim that are non-lubavitch, in sheer numbers.)
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